Advanced search
Top images  New images  
Registered users
Username:

Password:

Log me on automatically next visit?

» Forgot password
» Submissions & Registration
Random image

Dr James Muecke following the donation ceremony at Hakha Eye Centre
Dr James Muecke following the donation ceremony at Hakha Eye Centre
Comments: 0
James Muecke




Disconsolate Existence In Ships’ Graveyard | Ship breaking, Pakistan

“This is an emblematic depiction of the agony of hard labor. For saving themselves from hunger, they breathe in asbestos dust and toxic waste, thus they risk their lives everyday. On the verge of death, they risk their lives in order to endure themselves. They are passing their days on one of the world‘s most unregulated and hazardous industries, leaving a trail of debris, disability and death in its wake. I spend 10 days in the Gaddani ship-breaking yard north of Karachi in 2005. I witness workers dismantling large ships, piece by piece using no protection, in absence of tools, where one wrong move could result in death, they continually depending in their bare hands. In a city of dying ships flames with smoke rising, tormented with ship body parts, metal residue, asbestos, and oil spills. Barefooted workers with little access to necessary tools are vanishing ships on the rusty sand of Gaddani and break down these steel giants coming from all the harbours of the world.” – Gmb Akash

The beach of Gaddani, 50 miles north of Karachi in Pakistan, has become one of the two world biggest cemeteries of super tankers, cargoes and other vessels in the world. Thousands of men, mostly Pashto migrants, toil over the ships. They are seasonal workers, a large number of native and immigrant workers returning to their homeland near the Afghan border at harvest time. The group consists of–perhaps from Afghanistan. They pine for their beloveds, whom they get to see only during the year ends. For around USD 1.20 a day, thousands of workers labour to dismantle dozens of ships each year at the ship-breaking yard in Gaddani.
Rashed, a labourer at the Gaddani ship-breaking yard has worked for five years dismantling ships. He said: “Had we had any other way of earning bread, we would not have come here.” Workers are always under high risk of accident, though they hardly care to secure themselves. Under hitting rains of sparks, blowtorches split through the thick steel skin of a ship. As they are cut lose, the pieces of metal plummet to the ground with a roar. I saw workers, toiling ceaselessly, as though banished forever to an underworld.
Many workers operate in tight spaces where the air is thin, and in high temperatures caused by hot welding, which is widely used, not to mention that they are constantly exposed to flammable liquids like paints and solvents. The work carried well into the night shipyard in Gaddani, Pakistan. This is the ship graveyard that serves as the final destination for a significant part of the world’s fleet.
“Barefooted workers would take apart, bit by bit, the dying ships with their bare hands. On their shoulders, workers bore great metal plates to their destination. People complain about their crappy lives working in an air conditioned work place, imagine having this as your only option in life.” – Gmb Akash

Photo documentary by the award winning photojournalist GMB Akash
Website- http://www.gmb-akash.com
Blog- http://www.gmbakash.wordpress.com (Hits: 9435)

Bookmark and Share   

Slideshow



Found: 14 image(s) on 2 page(s). Displayed: image 1 to 12.



A worker at the Gaddani ship-breaking yard (GMB Akash)
Photo details & description
Disconsolate Existence In Ships’ Graveyard | Ship breaking, Pakistan
Comments: 0


Two workers take a short break while welding inside a ship's hull (GMB Akash)
Photo details & description
Disconsolate Existence In Ships’ Graveyard | Ship breaking, Pakistan
Comments: 0


A worker taking a break. (GMB Akash)
Photo details & description
Disconsolate Existence In Ships’ Graveyard | Ship breaking, Pakistan
Comments: 0


Workers dismantle a huge ship and carry it off piece by piece (GMB Akash)
Photo details & description
Disconsolate Existence In Ships’ Graveyard | Ship breaking, Pakistan
Comments: 0


USD 1.20 a day (GMB Akash)
Photo details & description
Disconsolate Existence In Ships’ Graveyard | Ship breaking, Pakistan
Comments: 0


A worker at the ship-breaking yard in Gaddani enters a ship's hull (GMB Akash)
Photo details & description
Disconsolate Existence In Ships’ Graveyard | Ship breaking, Pakistan
Comments: 0


A break from work (GMB Akash)
Photo details & description
Disconsolate Existence In Ships’ Graveyard | Ship breaking, Pakistan
Comments: 0


Welding inside a ship's hull (GMB Akash)
Photo details & description
Disconsolate Existence In Ships’ Graveyard | Ship breaking, Pakistan
Comments: 0


Rashed, a labourer at the Gaddani ship-breaking yard (GMB Akash)
Photo details & description
Disconsolate Existence In Ships’ Graveyard | Ship breaking, Pakistan
Comments: 0


Resting on the beach (GMB Akash)
Photo details & description
Disconsolate Existence In Ships’ Graveyard | Ship breaking, Pakistan
Comments: 0


Tattered shoes and trousers (GMB Akash)
Photo details & description
Disconsolate Existence In Ships’ Graveyard | Ship breaking, Pakistan
Comments: 0


A worker prays in his quarters (GMB Akash)
Photo details & description
Disconsolate Existence In Ships’ Graveyard | Ship breaking, Pakistan
Comments: 0

1  2  »  Last page »

Images per page: 

 

 

RSS Feed: Disconsolate Existence In Ships’ Graveyard | Ship breaking, Pakistan (New images)

Powered by 4images 1.7.4   Copyright © 2002-20114homepages.de

Modified and deployed by Bladedigital.


All photographs and text in this site are the exclusive property of the authors. Unauthorized duplication or usage of these images or text is prohibited by International Copyright Law. Photographs nor texts may be reproduced, copied or used in any way without the express written permission of the authors.
PhotographySites
Documentary Photographers
Dphotojournal